Scaping a re-birth BETA

Through these visuals and text I will be exploring how nostalgia can revive a games popularity or ruin its evolution potential. specifically exploring the question of; why bringing back an outdated version of a game result in more response and play time? leading to the re-birth or division of a gaming community.

Firstly before discussion of these concepts I want to provide some context to my readers. Such is provide bellow. I also want to mention that this is a first draft for a major project and I encourage all input for presentation and discussion. For the first draft I have focused on my direction for future discussion, receiving feedback and developing research into previously written texts.

WHAT IS RUNESCAPE?

Runescape is a fan stay based MMORPG ( massively multiplayer online roleplaying game) created by British developer of video games, Jagex Games studio ( or Jagex Ltd. as its more commonly known) With over 250million accounts created multiple spin-off games, a series of books, and a very dedicated fanbase, Runescape is arguably one of the most popular franchises of online games ever.”

Playing Runescape in 2007:

 

NOSTALGIA IN HISTORY AND NOW:

Nostalgia is a powerful and lucrative tool in pop culture

“The scientist who coined the term ‘nostalgia’ in 1688 thought of this emotion as a neurological illness caused by demons. Other scientists latched onto this conception of nostalgia as a disease. It took marketers, centuries later, to realise that nostalgia has benefits” (Cohen, 2017)

Nostalgia is normally defined as longing for sentimental actions or objects in the past. especially if its thinking about a time when things used to be better. “Researchers in psychology and consumer behaviour have decided these questions, and what they’ve found out suggests that video games may have the potential to elicit more nostalgia than any other medium”(Madigan, 2013).

“Beyond using nostalgia as a blunt marketing technique, video games as a medium in particular appeal to players longing for the past. Clay Routledge, a psychology professor at North Dakota state university who’s made a career out of studying nostalgia, has said gaming lends itself to the feeling more than other mediums because of its immersion factor – games have the potential to be more immediate and personal than other forms of entertainment players aren’t remembering the time they watched a hero defeat a bad guy. and they’re remembering the time they beat the bad guy”.

After receiving feedback from my potential audience as shown in the Youtube video and interviews bellow, I’ve also decided to have a heavy focus on Paticipartory media culture, through which I shall demonstrate in the analytical framework bellow

Screen Shot 2019-09-27 at 5.17.00 pm.png

Acompnaying this I believe it would be valuable to include texts such as; “Computer games as participatory media culture” by Joost Raessens. With the specific discussion of the interactivity “Interactivity refers to ‘‘a distinctive mode of relating to audiovisual representations or fictions. The player is provided with a way of directly taking a leading role in what occurs, given the means to control—at least in part—what will unfold within the scene on the screen’’ (Darley, 2000, p. 156).

 

Interview Transcripts:

First interview

Riley, 27, Male

How did you find OSRS

“I saw it advertised on facebook as well as that one of my friends that used to play with me mentioned that it had come back up”

Was it to do with nostalgia?

“YES! I used to have so much fun when I was a kid playing these games, they used to take up all my free time and I got really good at them, but I think nostalgia was what drew me into the game but what ultimately kept me playing the game is probably only about 30% nostalgia and the rest is that I genuinely enjoy playing the game”

Have you played RS3? Why or why not?

“No, I haven’t, honestly I don’t have any interest in the new game, I remember the old game the best and I remember things about the OSRS that help me to achieve more things in the game, the new game just doesn’t start my interest”

Do you think nostalgia saves games or halts its evolution potential?

“No, I think that with different games it may have but with RS they have two different versions, one that evolves and one that remains the same apart from some content updates that are voted on by the players”

Do you think it divides the community? Is this good or bad in your opinion.

“Yes in a way, but I don’t think that its a bad thing. I think there are niche communities within every game and this one just so happens to be divided probably by nostalgia”

What’s the community like on OSRS

” There are a lot of old school players, people close to their 30’s playing, but overall the community is experienced gamers, where I believe on the RS3 there are more new players”

Why do you think nostalgia is so successful in gaming?

“It’s a good advertising point, nostalgia is what drew me back into the game, I like to re-vist the days when I was a kid, remember the fun that I use to have when I was younger. I think nostalgia can save games as well, when the old game starts to die off they can bring out a new version that from 10 years ago and people get excited again like they did when it first came out, bringing up all those old emotions and they hope they will have just as much fun again. Good marketing if you ask me”

Second interview

Georgia, 22, Female

What interested you most about the pitch and the draft blog?

“I’m really interested in seeing the gameplay from then and now, comparing the two. I also liked the point where you said you wanted to discuss if nostalgia has the potential to crush a games evolution, thats really interesting and I’ve never thought about it form that perspective before”

What was most relevant to you?

“In terms of relevance, I was more so interested in the effect that the topics you have discussed have or haven’t had an impact on Runescape, has it made any difference? I really want to know what happened in the end? or was or more just the process with little effects throughout”

What do you think would be most useful to my project?

Visuals, Runescape is so visual, but I think its important that you also do really good research to show that the things you’ve stated have relevance elsewhere, breaking it down like you have has also helped me understand what your talking about because I have context of each part of your project”

When did you first starting playing runescape, when did you stop and why?

I was 12 years old, I stopped when I was about 16 as I lost interest and other things came up, the game also became boring, and once it was updated heaps I couldn’t keep up anymore and it was too hard to play”

Why are you playing again now?

“oh the nostalgia! its been so long! I like to go in and see its all the same, the memories are insane”

How are you playing?

“I play on my mobile, which is different to how I used to play”

FURTHER RESEARCH SUMMARISED IN A BETA PITCH:

 

References

Cohen, R. (2019). Nostalgia Isn’t Just A Fixation On The Past – It Can Be About The Future, Too. [online] Wwno.org. Available at: https://www.wwno.org/post/nostalgia-isnt-just-fixation-past-it-can-be-about-future-too [Accessed 2 Sep. 2019].

Madigan, J. (2013). The Psychology of Video Game Nostalgia. [online] The Psychology of Video Games. Available at: https://www.psychologyofgames.com/2013/11/the-psychology-of-video-game-nostalgia/ [Accessed 6 Sep. 2019].

Raessens, J. and Goldstein, J. (2011). Handbook of computer game studies. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

RuneScape. (2019). RuneScape Online Community – Forums, News, Events and more. [online] Available at: https://www.runescape.com/community [Accessed 3 Sep. 2019].

8 thoughts on “Scaping a re-birth BETA

  1. I’m really excited to see this final text on this topic, it has always fascinated me how nostalgia exists so heavily in gaming. its interesting that you’ll be discussing whether or not it has the potential to halt the ‘evolution’ of the game. I think with RS you will have two sides to the story because people did get stuck in a loop of playing the old version of the game but because they have RS3 and OSRS all the players are given what they want, I suggest you watch some YouTube videos of people playing OSRS, they tend to discuss in the comments everything to do with the differences between the two. As well as this I also read your pitch for the project and I think the videos are an excellent idea! they are interesting and they give heaps of contexts. Hope this helps you out

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  2. I’ve just read through this and watched the videos, this is a topic with a lot of potential. I think potentially that nostalgia is what draws people into the game but then people are staying because of the tools and game trading.a lot of people have items that are worth a lot fo real life money as well as credit points on the game. As well as this people stay because of the way the game has been set up as the golden age era of gaming in Runescape. I’d love to see some more images in your posts, but other then that there’s potential and I like the title of the page

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  3. The visuals will be an excellent addition to your project, however I believe because its a game the ‘gameplay’ is important to show in action, but keep the photos as well! potentially just do less, under 10 maybe. But love the idea!

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  4. Hey Serena!

    I think you did a really awesome job with your project and pitch. It’s very organised and you can definitely tell that you used a range of sources (interviews, online videos, articles, etc.). As you already know, this definitely helps with viewing the bigger picture! You also did well with showing what you did/did not change from your Pitch, as well as your feedback loop with audiences on different platforms.

    It was good to see how you included the definition + background of nostalgia (I had no idea the term has been around that long?), as well as some background info on Runescape. It might help if you add a quick sentence or two about the different versions of the game- found a quick article on it that might help!….
    https://www.engadget.com/2018/11/01/old-school-runescape-mobile-ios-android/

    Other sources that might help…

    2013 Runescape website blog on voting to bring back the Classic version…
    https://secure.runescape.com/m=news/a=13/2007—old-school-runescape-you-vote

    Very short source I found that basically talks about the Runescape classic release (includes some good pictures)…”RuneScape creator Jagex wants you to see, first hand, how far the game has come in 10 years.”
    https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2011-09-15-jagex-reopening-runescape-classic-today

    End of RS Classic because of game-breaking bugs (Runescape website’s blog)…
    https://secure.runescape.com/m=news/a=13/runescape-classic-farewell?oldschool=1

    Hope this helps and good luck with the rest of your project! 🙂

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  5. Serena, this DA looks excellent so far. I really like the use of primary research, and I think that reaching out to players on Reddit and interviewing a Runescape player will give your final post a rich insight into nostalgia in gaming culture. I also love your focus on ‘re-birth or division’ and exploring the implications of OSRS existing alongside RS3. It is very similar to the recent ‘WoW Classic’ situation (which you can read more about on Harrison’s DA blog post if you’re interested; [ https://bit.ly/2mZqK8U ] ), and one very small, very niche, French MMORPG that I first played at 8 years old called ‘Dofus’ is now releasing ‘Dofus Retro’, which is, again, the same kind of situation. It seems to be a current trend to release these older patches and make them playable once again for a new… or I guess ‘old’, playerbase. Nostalgia is a HUGE factor in the recent trajectory of the gaming industry; there are countless remakes of classic games, and Nintendo is also re-releasing their old consoles with full game libraries, such as the ‘SNES Classic Mini’ [ https://www.nintendo.com.au/snes-classic/ ]

    I have some feedback for the formatting and layout of your blog. I think that having gameplay shown in the blog post does help, but maybe consider using gifs instead of embedded videos? The benefits would be that they ‘play’ without needing to be clicked on, and load much faster. I think it would make the page look more dynamic at first glance, and because they are looped it will keep the gameplay constantly in view for the reader. This is just a subjective suggestion, as either method works fine.
    I also recommend that you make the interview section easier to read and follow along by formatting the questions as bold or underlined text to separate them from the answers, and perhaps italicising the whole section to show that you are quoting your own research.

    I think you’re well on the right track, and the post looks very promising so far. The most interesting aspect of your analysis for me was your question about how nostalgia might potentially hinder the future development of the game. I found this brief article that discusses the potential pitfalls of companies feeding into nostalgia marketing, and how the consistent use of these nostalgia-based strategies in game development may be risky for stakeholders;
    [ https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2015/11/nostalgia-video-games/416751/ ]

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